Crisis in Egypt Likely to Persist

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Egypt is facing what Algeria faced in the 1990s. Nothing is working. The economy is in despair and a civil war is underway essentially pitting the military in power to Islamist factions. Sister company MEA Risk says the latter could be summarized into two major groups. The first represents the Muslim Brotherhood (MB), which is represented by a wide range of players and militants seeking to disrupt the Sissi regime mostly politically and through civil disobedience. The ongoing confrontations in Egyptian universities between students and the police generally fall under the domain of MB influence. The second group of Islamist militants is much more violent and is part of the global Jihadist movement, essentially linked to either Al Qaeda and more recently to the brutal Islamic State organization (ISIS).

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The North Africa Journal is a leading English-language publication focused on North Africa. The Journal covers primarily the Maghreb region and expands its general coverage to the Sahel, Egypt, and beyond, when events in those regions affect the broader North Africa geography. The Journal does not have any affiliation with any institution and has been independent since its founding in 1996. Our position is to always bring our best analysis of events affecting the region, and remain as neutral as humanly possible. Our coverage is not limited to one single topic, but ranges from economic and political affairs, to security, defense, social and environmental issues. We rely on our full staff analysts and editors to bring you best-in-class analysis. We also work with sister company MEA Risk LLC, to leverage the presence on the ground of a solid network of contributors and experts. Information on MEA Risk can be found at www.MEA-Risk.com.