Egypt: The Extraordinary Tale of a Wholesale Death Sentence

Email this to someonePrint this page

The Egyptian regime is using some of the most severe tools of punishment to signal its Islamist foes that it means business. Death sentencing is obviously one of them, except that in Egypt it is done en-mass and without sufficient due diligence and investigations to sentence the accused beyond reasonable doubt. This week, Giza’s criminal court sentenced 188 defendants to death for an alleged attack on a police station in August 2013 that resulted in 13 deaths, including 11 police officers. MEA Risk says a confirmation of the sentencing is scheduled for end of January 2015, after the court hears a non-binding opinion from religious authorities.

– To read the full analysis for free, register here.
– Paying subscribers of The North Africa Journal, please click on this link

Profile photo of The North Africa Journal

The North Africa Journal is a leading English-language publication focused on North Africa. The Journal covers primarily the Maghreb region and expands its general coverage to the Sahel, Egypt, and beyond, when events in those regions affect the broader North Africa geography. The Journal does not have any affiliation with any institution and has been independent since its founding in 1996. Our position is to always bring our best analysis of events affecting the region, and remain as neutral as humanly possible. Our coverage is not limited to one single topic, but ranges from economic and political affairs, to security, defense, social and environmental issues. We rely on our full staff analysts and editors to bring you best-in-class analysis. We also work with sister company MEA Risk LLC, to leverage the presence on the ground of a solid network of contributors and experts. Information on MEA Risk can be found at www.MEA-Risk.com.