As Oil Production Rises in Libya, so are Local Tribes and Militias’ Fortunes

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After reaching its lowest level a few months ago, Libya’s oil production has been slowly rising to reach an estimated 800,000 barrels per day. It is still half of its peak, but it is a significant evolution in a country that is in war. Indeed what is peculiar is this apparently organized sector seems to operate in the middle of a major political and security chaos. This begs the question as to who is really in charge. On the ground, the Misratan militias continue to gain momentum as a political and military force. This is happening at the expanse of the other tribal militias and the pro-Gaddafi lobbies. The rise of the Misratans is also hurting the central government. Still, despite the rise of one, and the weakening of many, the management and oversight of the oil sector is the domain of not a single authority and remains at the center of a fight involving virtually all the political and militia forces.

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